domingo, 30 de junho de 2013

3 de junho, rádio The Voice of Russia: "Primavera turca ou apenas uma tempestade sazonal?" 19 de junho, Seattle Times: Comparação entre manifestações no Brasil e na Turquia, vale ler

3 June, 20:21  

Turkey unrest: “Turkish spring” or just a seasonal storm?

More protests are expected in the unrest-gripped Turkey after a weekend of anti-government demonstrations across the country.

The government seems to be completely unprepared both for the motives behind the protests and their evolution from a rally against plans to redevelop an Istanbul park into anti-government calls.
Turkey is not used to active street protests but the genie of unrest is already out of the bottle, and the protests were hardy sparked by plans to rebuild the Gezi Park alone. Experts name various versions of the events.
Some say that people are unhappy with a projected law limiting alcohol consumption in the country, some claim that Turks don’t like proposed changes in the governing system granting more powers to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan after the 2014 elections.
Fierce clashes between tens of thousands of protesters and riot police have been reported in the Turkish capital of Ankara as well as the country’s major cities of Istanbul and Izmir. Thousands have been detained.


Turkey is not used to active street protests but the genie of unrest is already out of the bottle, and the protests were hardy sparked by plans to rebuild the Gezi Park alone. Experts name various versions of the events.

Some say that people are unhappy with a projected law limiting alcohol consumption in the country, some claim that Turks don’t like proposed changes in the governing system granting more powers to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan after the 2014 elections.

A number of analysts link the events to the growing Turkish economy which created a new protesting middle class craving greater freedoms.

Russian political analyst Stanislav Tarasov says that the situation requires research. “Today’s unrest will be thoroughly analyzed, primarily by Turkish experts as the reason behind it is more complicated than a battle for a park or for the right to drink alcohol”.

Tarasov also names the government-led soft Islamization as a possible reason. Some people didn’t like plans to demolish the Ataturk Cultural Center and build a mosque at the site, thus neglecting the heritageand legacyofthe first President of Turkey Kemal Ataturk.

Part of the Turkish population is unhappy with the country’s external policy, mainly its unconcealed support of the Syrian opposition.

Though the violent police crackdown added fuel to the fire of protests, it didn’t ignite them. However, this can hurt Turkey’s democratic reputation which took quite an effort to build.

Recently, the EU High Representative Catherine Ashton urged the Turkish government to hold a dialogue with the demonstrators to “find a peaceful solution.” In her statement, Catherine Aston expressed concerns with “the violence that occurred in Istanbul and some other Turkish cities as well as disproportionate use of force by the Turkish police”.

However, a dialogue is easier said than done as protesters seem to be really determined and want Erdogan to quit.

VoR Istanbul observer Olga Khaldyz discussed the situation with some authoritative Turkish reporters. “Local media men say that Turkey has seen such spontaneous and unorganized protests for the first time. This is clearly an anti-Erdogan campaign, which is really surprising as no such ideas were voiced some 5-6 days ago. The unrest is unfolding right in the middle of attempts to peacefully resolve the Kurdish issue for which domestic peace is essential. Now, Turkey is going through some critical moments”.

Turkey’s President Abdullah Gul recently called for responsibility as the scale of the protests has caused real concerns. Erdogan was even harsher in calling the protesters extremists.

On June 3, Erdogan left the country for visits to Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, and nobody knows whether he will return to the same Turkey he used to lead.

http://english.ruvr.ru/2013_06_03/Turkey-unrest-Turkish-spring-or-just-a-seasonal-storm-3698/

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Comparison of mass protests in Brazil and Turkey

Originally published June 19, 2013 at 8:55 AM 

By KARL RITTER
Associated Press

Large-scale protests have engulfed Turkey and Brazil, which are thousands of miles apart, but share some traits such as being new democracies with a growing middle class. Here's a look at the protests in both countries, highlighting the similarities and differences in how they started and developed:

Large-scale protests have engulfed Turkey and Brazil, which are thousands of miles apart, but share some traits such as being new democracies with a growing middle class. Here's a look at the protests in both countries, highlighting the similarities and differences in how they started and developed:

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WHAT SPARKED THE PROTESTS?

BRAZIL: Unrest was set off earlier this month by a 10-cent hike in bus and subway fares in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and elsewhere. The protests soon moved beyond that issue to tap into widespread frustration in Brazil over a range of issues, including high taxes, woeful public services and enormous government spending for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics.

Widespread images of a violent police crackdown on protests last week galvanized tens of thousands to take to the streets.

TURKEY: Protests started May 28 with a peaceful sit-in by environmental activists trying to prevent the uprooting of trees as part of plans to redevelop a park next to Istanbul's Taksim Square.

A police crackdown three days later incited nationwide protests.

WHAT DO THEY WANT?
BRAZIL: The only concrete demand so far is for local governments to reverse recent hikes in public transportation fares. Demonstrators are expressing deep anger with corruption in government and the low quality of public services. They're also slamming Brazil's government for spending billions of dollars to host the World Cup and the Olympics while leaving other needs unmet.
TURKEY: The protests have in large part been directed at Erdogan, his attempts to strengthen his rule through constitutional changes and what some say is the erosion of freedoms and secular values. They have also exposed fissures between the conservative and religious classes and the urban and largely secular-oriented Turks.
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HOW DID AUTHORITIES REACT?

BRAZIL: Police responded forcefully to a single protest last week, with riot police firing tear gas and rubber bullets into crowds and beating protesters with batons. The crackdown energized more people to join the protests.

President Dilma Rousseff, a former leftist guerrilla who was imprisoned and tortured during Brazil's 1964-85 dictatorship, hailed the protests for raising questions and strengthening Brazil's democracy, but has yet to offer concrete solutions to the myriad problems. Unlike Turkey's leader, Rousseff remains popular among many of the protesters.

TURKEY: A violent intervention by police at Taksim Square escalated the situation, with protests spreading quickly across Turkey. The U.N. and human rights activists expressed alarm over reports that tear gas canisters and pepper spray were fired directly at demonstrators and into closed spaces. Police have also used water cannons to disperse crowds. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan criticized the protesters in bellicose language that upset European leaders and seems to have caused another setback to Turkey's chances of EU membership.

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WHO ARE THE PROTESTERS?

BRAZIL: A single group calling for lowered transit fees set the protests in motion, but the mass gatherings are showing no evidence of any central leadership, with people using social media to call for marches and rallies. The protests have drawn a mix of leftist groups, students, disgruntled ordinary citizens and a minority of masked vandals.

TURKEY: The protesters have included people from all walks of life, but are mainly urban, educated, middle-class and mostly secular-minded people, venting their anger at what they say are Erdogan's increasingly autocratic ways. His Islamic-rooted ruling party has passed restrictions on the sale and advertising of alcohol and tried to limit women's access to abortion, but later abandoned those plans.

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WHAT DO THEY WANT?

BRAZIL: The only concrete demand so far is for local governments to reverse recent hikes in public transportation fares. Demonstrators are expressing deep anger with corruption in government and the low quality of public services. They're also slamming Brazil's government for spending billions of dollars to host the World Cup and the Olympics while leaving other needs unmet.

TURKEY: The protests have in large part been directed at Erdogan, his attempts to strengthen his rule through constitutional changes and what some say is the erosion of freedoms and secular values. They have also exposed fissures between the conservative and religious classes and the urban and largely secular-oriented Turks.

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HOW LARGE HAVE THE PROTESTS BEEN?

BRAZIL: The demonstrations have been mushrooming across the country. On Tuesday night, around 50,000 people massed for a protest in Sao Paulo. The previous night, protests across Brazil drew about 240,000 people. Massive and widespread protests are being called for on Thursday.

TURKEY: The protests quickly spread from central Istanbul to dozens of cities across Turkey. Tens of thousands took to the streets in nightly protests which at times turned violent. Their numbers have now dwindled to a couple of thousand in Ankara on Tuesday night. A new form of peaceful resistance is now spreading through Turkey, with people standing motionless in a symbolic protest.

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AP writers Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey, and Bradley Brooks in Sao Paulo, Brazil, contributed to this report.

http://seattletimes.com/html/politics/2021221879_apturkeybrazilprotests.html

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